Encouraging Change, Seeing Hope

Year: 2

In class, my students are currently reading a book about workers’ rights and the history of protest. Honestly, a big part of why we are reading this book is due to the pressure in education right now to read nonfiction, informational text (I have very strong opinions on why only English teachers are feeling that pressure but that’s a different conversation for a different day). The really cool aspect of this book are the conversations I get to have with students, and I saw that today in a surprising way.

This morning, I began grading assignments that my students had completed while reading part of the book; it was the section that explained the origin of this particular workers’ strike. One question I put on the handout, due more to personal curiosity than anything else, was the following: “What do you feel strongly about in the ‘real world’ that you want to change or support? How would you go about making that change, or making it stronger?”

The answers were incredible.

Now, there were a few silly ones. It is middle school, after all, and middle school is an odd place. One such answer said “I would make a strike that unicorns be real and I’d glue horns to horses.” (I still don’t know if that’s genuine or not.)

Most answers, though, were so powerful and heartwarming. Students wrote about fighting animal testing, finding a cure for cancer, lowering costs of healthy food for impoverished families, fighting climate change, lowering pollution, gun control regulation, teacher pay, deportation policies, government shut downs, tax laws (!!!), and more. These kids are seventh graders.

It should not surprise me that my students are capable of this type of answer. I see their curiosity and awareness in our class discussions. More than anything else, I found it incredibly heartwarming and endearing to read these answers. These kids care about the world around them. They are aware – with the internet, more aware, perhaps, than we were at their age – of the issues our society has, and they are concerned.

I need more conversations like this with my students. I want to encourage their curiosity, but I also find it filled with so much hope to see my students this focused on making the world a better place.

Weekly Review

Year: 2

This week was funky.

I’d been gone for about half of the week (family wedding! yay!), so I only taught two days today. Yesterday was… bumpy. My students did not do any of the work that I’d assigned them while I’d be away, so I basically threw out the lesson I’d planned and made them redo assignments. That’s never fun; it’s boring for students, but it’s mainly a punishment for teachers, honestly. Not a great time. Today, I gave my students the choice between working on the reading individually (silent, calm, largely put together) or partner reading (see: absolute chaos), and most chose partner reading. In multiple classes, I had a “I’m Disappointed in You Mom Tone” discussion about discipline and good work habits.

Some of my kids were pretty bratty: defiant, mean, or lazy. Probably because I’d been gone long enough they somehow forgot that they have an English teacher with high expectations for them? One of my colleagues, who teaches eighth grade, walked out of class in tears because she realized a kid was actively bullying another kid in her class – and absolutely nobody would tell her who was the bully.

There were a few shining highlights, however. Students are put on an improvement plan if they failed the previous quarter, and several of my students on that plan chose me as their ‘trusted teacher’ for helping them succeed. One of my students came running up to me during lunch, tried to teach me a handshake, then patted me on the head before running away. (So middle school.) Another student dance/hopped/snake-charmer-impressioned? away from me after class today, and, while doing so, told me that he would teach me his smooth moves next week. Another student told me that it felt like “a gift from god” that I was back and she no longer had to deal with substitute teachers.

My first impression is that it felt like a funky week, but really, it wasn’t so funky. Basically, this was just another week of teaching. High moments and low moments, with my choice on what to focus on. I’m going to focus on the weird dancing and handshakes – it’s far more fun that way.

Weekly Review

Monday: A former student stopped by my class today at the end of the day to show me something he’d drawn. The middle school way of saying hello, welcome back from winter break.

Tuesday: During a class discussion, a student mentioned something he learned in social studies. He paused during this, saying about halfway through, “in social studies… uh, shout out to Mr. R, in social studies we learned….”

Wednesday: One student finished his work early and, instead of reading a library book as I ask, was sitting and doing nothing. I asked him if he needed to borrow a book and he said no, smiling, and reached into the world’s messiest backpack. I asked him again after a minute of him fishing around his backpack, and he said no again. After a few more seconds of moving around stuff in his backpack, he slowly looked up and asked me, “…. Could I borrow a book?” Such a middle school move.

Thursday: One of my classes got in a heated argument about whether a sloth or a panda would win in a fight.

Friday: Every Friday, I ask my students what was the best part of their week. One student sweetly said that it was my class. Another student said it was getting in a 4-wheeler accident where he flew off the 4-wheeler and it flipped over him. (He neglected to say he’s okay until I asked him. He’s okay.)

Kicking Off the Quarter

I try to create routines in my classroom. Although not every day can or should be the same, I think it is helpful for most students know what to expect – or, at least, have a few parts of the class they can grow to expect. One of these routines are my students’ quarterly goals.

The assignment is simple: write down two sentences. One sentence should be your goal to reach by the end of the quarter, and one sentence should be how you will reach that goal.

A wall in the back of my classroom is decorated with these goals. I want them displayed so that my students see them when they walk into class every day. To prep for this activity beforehand, I make sure to create paper cutouts before the quarter begins. Sometimes I make these paper slips in the shape of a book or an apple, but oftentimes, it’s just a circle another easy shape. I hand these out during bell work on one of the first days of school, and give them until the end of their bell work to have their goal written down.

This is a simple way to begin the discussion of forming goals with my students, how those goals need structure, and how we can work to get there. (Also, it looks super cool at the back of my classroom.)

Weekly Review

Monday: Day off!

Tuesday: Today, after class, a former student came in to say hello to me and found out I was hosting study hall. He called home to ask if he could stay and I overheard him say, “yeah, I wasn’t planning to stay, but my favorite teacher’s hosting study hall, so I can just take the bus after if that’s okay.”

Wednesday: Halfway through class, one of my students raised his hand and asked for a pencil. I asked him what happened to the pencil he’d been using. With a look of pure, painful confusion, he replied “Um. It went…. under the wall.” (I have not told them one of the walls can fold back between classrooms.)

Thursday: The highlight of my day today was discovering a student wrote “BUTTS” on the class sign-in sheet. I looked at it and, calmly, silently, tore off the bottom of the sign-in sheet before turning around. As soon as I faced the class, a boy in the back turned bright red and began hysterically giggling in his hand. Naturally, the only appropriate response I found was to take a photo of the culprit – him – holding the paper.

Friday: Today, I told one of my more rowdy students that he should be in theatre (because of how dramatic he was being in our conversation). He threw his hand to his chest, dropped his jaw, and – genuinely, I think – said, “thank you, Miss!”

Remembering the Reason

Tonight, I attended one of the school’s plays, a back-to-back showing of two one-acts. It was hilarious and silly, and as I applauded for my students and former students, it was a very serious reminder to me why I chose this career.

I need to be more aware of those reminders when they pass me by. They are so, so important.

Today was not the most fantastic day of all time. There were some pretty disheartening moments, honestly. Two of my four classes felt totally checked out of the lesson, leading to a lot of poor behavior and thus discipline, and one of my boys got suspended while already attending in-school suspension.

Then I had study hall. Two of my all-time favorite kids, both of whom are former students and currently working with special education kids in our school, asked me to wear purple for epilepsy awareness next week; one gave me a bracelet that he made for the occasion and told me, “I got you, Miss, here is your purple” so that I could represent.

These are kids I love, kids I would do anything to help. They are kids I spent a year with, who I will remember for the rest of my life.

I stayed at school after study hall, planning to grade until the play; I mainly just talked to other teachers and hung out, drinking coffee, before wandering over to the auditorium. It was wonderful. I saw former students, kids who were teeny-tiny and awkward and uncomfortable with themselves last year blossom on stage and deliver hilarious one-liners throughout the performance.

As they all lined up to bow, and I cheered and applauded with everyone, I made sure to tell a few of my former students how proud I was of them. What a cool thing it is to be able to have connections like this with kids, and see them grow into themselves. What a privilege it is – even with the stress, and the anxiety, and everything that I’m still learning how to struggle with, I had the opportunity to cheer on students that I no longer teach but still support. That’s pretty damn cool.

Weekly Review

Monday: One of my former students came by to tell me that she misses me. It’s not a funny story, or something odd, or even particularly noteworthy, but it was the highlight of my day.

Tuesday:  In my last class today, I’d just begun reading an article to my students when my door opened and my student from another class walked in the room. She had cupcakes (I have no idea why) and was coming into my classroom (who knows why she was leaving the class she should’ve been in) to give me one. They were Halloween-themed, and the whole class groaned in jealousy when I picked out a cupcake. They asked to split it. The whole cupcake, split 30 ways.

Wednesday: Today was Halloween, which is always an odd day to teach. It’s difficult to discipline when you’re dressed as a fictional character and have a box of Eggo Waffles on your desk as an accessory.

Thursday: I read a poem to one of my classes, and because I want them to be interested, I tried to read it with as much emotion as I could. One of my students reacted to that by saying, “Miss, you should be a preacher.”

Friday:  Today we had class in the library. Halfway through the day, a student asked me at the end of class, “Miss, do you let all of your classes come to the library, or are we the only ones who go?” …. Nah, just you guys.